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How to Add Warmth, Color & Texture to Your Advertisements
"…A powerful agent is the right word…" --Mark Twain And what true words those are! Your marketing efforts have the ability to succeed…or to fail…based on the words you choose to represent your products, services, and yourself in your ads. ...
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Grow Sales Using Image Tactics

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In my dreams, I envision being the marketing consultant equivalent of Oprah or Tiger Woods. Oprah, for her premise, “You’re a woman and only you are responsible for yourself.” Tiger Woods, for his ultimate dedication to the game. Respectively, this is what they’re known for or what their personal value can be identified as; put another way, this is what their brand identities are.

Once you’re known for something and people perceive value in “this something [your brand],” it’s at this moment that you start to make money. Once you have perceived value, other entrepreneurs and businesses will pay money to be associated with the perception for which you’re known.

To be an entrepreneur, the first decision you must make is, “Who do you want to be?” Or, put another way, “How do you want to be perceived by others?” The answers to these two questions are equivalent to the foundation that’ll drive all of your future marketing decisions, from what advertising vehicles you’ll use, to the type of customers and clients you’ll target.

For example, would you like to be known as the world’s most prestigious dietician? People all over the world seek you out and pay money for your advice on how to integrate more color into their diets. To build a foundation and reach such prestige, your image marketing plan might involve the following actions.


  • Complete appropriate credentials such as certifications and higher education.

  • Obtain and make visible reputable references including popular media personalities quoting you as an expert, current and past clients quoting specific things you did to help them, and a variety of print articles and electronic news bulletins in which you’re quoted.

  • Build credibility by hosting, writing or producing a weekly healthy-eating column called, “Got Colors, Get Healthy.”

  • Socialize and be seen with other health-related well-known experts or people who exhibit healthy behavior such as: other dietitians, diet book authors, athletes, personal trainers, physiology professors and food scientists. Why? Because a person can create an implied credibility about themselves simply by hanging out with other experts. Generally speaking, people assume that because the other experts let you hang with them, then you must be worthy of your “expert” status.

  • Pick a unique clothing and makeup style and stick with it. A simple example, perhaps every time you leave your house, you always wear something purple, a scarf, pin, shirt, tie or nail polish. The repetitive purple creates a subliminal image, that, after awhile, causes people, when they see you in the news, at an event or in a magazine, to say, “I’ve seen her somewhere.” And from this statement they extract that you’re sought after, and therefore, you must know what you’re talking about.

  • Always evolve your image based on current trends. However, remember to make small changes, so as not to walk away from the image you’ve been working hard to build.


Every entrepreneur’s image-building plan will be unique. In fact, it must be. It’s the subtle differences about you as an entrepreneur that distinguish you from your competition. More importantly, it’s also these differences that help your customers find you, since you’ll be more able to effectively and affordably reach customers by selecting an image niche.

Sharron Senter is a New England-based marketing consultant, speaker, writer and founder of Senter & Associates. She helps small and home-based businesses deploy affordable marketing strategies. She’s well known for her free weekly emailed marketing tips and her “14 Image-building Dos & Don’ts,” small biz survival report. Receive Senter’s free marketing tips at http://www.sharronsenter.com.


marketing@sharronsenter.com

 

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Killer Online Marketing Strategy Goes Offline

How To Write A Killer

5 Ways to Encourage Impulse Purchases


3 Tips For Writing Better Headlines
Copyright © 2005 by Bruce Carlson The single most important element of your website's copy is the headline. Take away practically everything else and you can still manage a sale (if the headline's good enough and you have a strong enough...
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Your First Trade Show Booth Display: Eight Success Tips
Exhibiting in a trade show can involve a major investment of money and time. But the financial returns for your business can be excellent if you learn some of the secrets of trade show booth success before signing up for a show and investing in...
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10 Ways To Get More Profit From Your E-zine
Publishing an e-zine will help you to strengthen your status as an expert in your field and convert more of your visitors into customers. The following tips will provide you with ways to successfully increase the revenue you get from...
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Not So Stationary Stationery
The elements and functionality of the basic stationery system is changing. With the advent of email, fax, web and cell phones, stationery systems must be adjusted to meet the needs of today’s business. Business Cards The biggest change by...
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The Language of Color
In a world already full of acronyms and codes, who would have thought that something as simple as color could join in the confusion? Knowing the different color models and how they are used is not only helpful in getting the visual results you...
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